Building Upon The Past & Mira Hecht

March 01, 2013 — April 02, 2013

Untitled #10,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #10, 2009
Oil on canvas
42 x 57 inches

Untitled #1,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #1, 2009
Graphite and kremer ink on gray paper
22 x 20 inches

Untitled #3,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #3, 2009
Mixed media on paper
15 x 11 inches

Untitled #4,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #4, 2006
Mixed media on paper
17 x 12 inches

Untitled #8,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #8, 2006
Mixed media on paper
18 x 15 inches

Untitled #8,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #8, 2005
Oil on linen
18 x 18 inches

Untitled #15,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #15, 2009
Oil on panel
18 x 18 inches

Sensations #19,

Mira Hecht
Sensations #19, 2010
Oil on panel
39 1/2 x 36 inches

Untiled #12,

Mira Hecht
Untiled #12, 2009
Oil on panel
8 x 10 inches each
8 x 30 inches set

Untitled #6,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #6, 2006
Mixed media on paper
13 x 11 inches

Untitled #18,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #18, 2005
Oil on linen
18 x 18 inches

Untitled #9,

Mira Hecht
Untitled #9, 2005
Oil on linen
24 x 24 inches

Peace,

Mira Hecht
Peace, 2012
Florescent acrylic and aluminum powder on panel
14 x 11 inches

Growth,

Mira Hecht
Growth, 2012
Florescent acrylic and aluminum powder on panel
14 x 11 inches

Insight,

Mira Hecht
Insight, 2012
Florescent acrylic and aluminum powder on panel
14 x 11 inches

Devotion,

Mira Hecht
Devotion, 2012
Florescent acrylic and aluminum powder on panel
14 x 11 inches

Man Up,

Erin Lynn Welsh
Man Up, 2012
Oil on paper
39 x 55 inches

Marriage Portrait,

Meredith Lachin
Marriage Portrait, 2012
Oil on canvas
18 x 24 inches each

Plant Bjorn 1,

Mary Ivy Martin
Plant Bjorn 1, 2008
Digital inkjet print
20 x 24 inches

Doha Flatware Series, #1,

Maria Stabio
Doha Flatware Series, #1, 2012
Oil on panel
25 x 19 1/2

Doha Flatware Series, #2,

Maria Stabio
Doha Flatware Series, #2, 2012
Oil on panel
25 x 19 1/2 inches

Pink Rug I,

Kaleena Stasiak
Pink Rug I, 2011
Etching with chine colle
22 x 30 inches

Pink Rug II,

Kaleena Stasiak
Pink Rug II, 2011
Etching with chine colle
22 x 30 inches

Touch Memory #2,

Andrea Donnelly
Touch Memory #2, 2013
Hand woven cotton and wool, dyed and felted
78 x 71 inches

Tools for Tongue Binding,

April Dauscha
Tools for Tongue Binding, 2013
Binding thread, scissors, wood, velvet, and mirror
6 x 6 x 2 inches

Tools for Tongue Veiling,

April Dauscha
Tools for Tongue Veiling, 2013
Handmade lace beil, muslin finger towel, wood, velvet, and mirror
6 x 5 x 2 inches

Custody of the Tongue,

April Dauscha
Custody of the Tongue, 2012
Video
00:02:28

Custody of the Tongue,

April Dauscha
Custody of the Tongue, 2013
Video
00:03:22

Penitent Magdalene,

April Dauscha
Penitent Magdalene, 2011
Video
00:07:31

Jewels of Cervidae,

Sayaka Suzuki
Jewels of Cervidae, 2011
Drywall, acrylic, embroidery, thread, wood
25 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches

The Three Bears: Baby Bear,

Sayaka Suzuki
The Three Bears: Baby Bear, 2011
Drywall, acrylic, embroidery, thread, wood
25 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches

The Three Bears: Mama Bear,

Sayaka Suzuki
The Three Bears: Mama Bear, 2011
Drywall, acrylic, embroidery, thread, wood
25 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches

Stitched,

Ginger Metzger
Stitched, 2010
Tissue paper, pva, thread
96 x 72 inches

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SPHERES OF INFLUENCE: RECENT WORK BY MIRA HECHT, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 2013


In conjunction with Building Upon The Past, Page Bond Gallery is pleased to present Spheres of Influence, a selection of recent work by Mira Hecht.


Mira Hecht’s “Close to Home” series is another step in her exploration of the formal, emotional, and spiritual properties of the circle.  Her intuitive, mandala-like compositions, reminiscent of light refracted through water droplets, have gained much critical acclaim.  They are simultaneously dynamic and quiet, strengthened by tensions between surface and depth, and positive and negative space. “The circle is a vast and mysterious form filled with potential.  Inspired by my own contemplative practice and glimpses of perfection within the mind’s eye, each painting is meant to be a small gesture of exaltation, pointing to joy, connection and wholeness,” Hecht says.  Her canvases have a meditative quality that rewards extended viewing.

An opening reception for the artists will take place at the Page Bond Gallery on Friday, March 1, from 7:00 to 9:00 pm.  The exhibition will remain on view through April 1, 2013.

The Page Bond Gallery, located at 1635 West Main Street, exhibits contemporary art in a wide variety of media and disciplines including painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture and ceramics.  The gallery acts as a venue for the work of emerging and established artists with local, national, and international reputations.

 

BUILDING UPON THE PAST:  A GROUP EXHIBITION OF 10 EMERGING WOMEN ARTISTS, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 2013.
Curated by Amara Craighill and Sarah Irvin

In honor of Women’s History Month, the Page Bond Gallery is pleased to present Building Upon The Past:  a selection of new works by April Dauscha, Andrea Donnelly, Meredith Lachlin, Mary Ivy Martin, Ginger Metzger, Maria Stabio, Kaleena Stasiak, Sayaka Suzuki, Erin Lynn Welsh, and Augusta Wilson.

This group exhibition brings together 10 emerging women artists. Their works engage directly or indirectly with various roles, symbols, and activities that female artists of previous generations were compelled to challenge or usurp.  These include symbols of traditional feminine domesticity, motherhood, marriage, and the female body; the male gaze; and the reclaiming of conventionally feminine art forms such as quilting, embroidery, and needlework.


Chicago artist April Dauscha’s mixed-media practice examines fundamental questions about faith, devotion, femininity, and ritualistic decoration of the body.  Much of her work is inspired by the traditions of Catholicism and the need to reconcile the ancient traditions of many faiths with the changing cultural status of women.  As Dauscha notes, many rituals and beliefs associated with Catholicism—“marriage as sacrament, motherhood, the female body as sacred vessel, and veiling at mass”—were abandoned by women in the 20th century, along with the traditional gender roles that were upheld by the Catholic Church.  Dauscha’s video and installation work, which involves the objects and rituals of veiling and anointment, hints at the complex, though perhaps less strained and more accepting, relationship of recent generations of women to their faith.


Brooklyn artist Mary Ivy Martin uses photography, performance, and installation to explore the Nature-Culture dichotomy, often playfully alluding to the traditional association of women with nature and the exaggerated division between natural and human worlds.  For her Plant Bjorn series, she photographed several people going about their daily lives toting plants in baby carriers.  The work, which appears tongue-in-cheek, can also be interpreted as an exaggeration of the perceived closeness of women to nature, a reminder about the fragility of the natural world, or as a light-hearted embrace of the role of caretaker and parent.


The work of Canadian artist Kaleena Stasiak memorializes the traditional art forms of women in the 19th and early 20th centuries.  It challenges the historical bias, institutionalized by western art history, for fine art over craft.  Building upon the work of artists like Miriam Schapiro, also from Toronto, Stasiak calls attention to the power structure inherent in the marginalization of craft, and seeks to legitimize under-appreciated art practices like quilting, hand-stitching and sewing.  “By referencing quilt patterns, patchwork and the tropes of thread used in embroidery in my work I call into question the unfair distinctions between art and craft that . . . are artificially constructed by the art establishment,” says Stasiak.

Some of the questions the exhibition seeks to address are: How is this new generation of artists able to incorporate one or more of these traditionally feminine symbols or roles into their work rather than feel compelled to refuse them?  If these artists can be viewed collectively, what distinguishes their outlook from that of previous generations of women artists?  What gender-related challenges, if any, do they face in making their work and having it collected, displayed, and reviewed?  How do female artists of this generation fit into the multifaceted feminist movement?

An opening reception for the artists will take place at the Page Bond Gallery on Friday, March 1, from 7:00 to 9:00 pm.  The exhibition will remain on view through April 1, 2013.

The Page Bond Gallery, located at 1635 West Main Street, exhibits contemporary art in a wide variety of media and disciplines including painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture and ceramics.  The gallery acts as a venue for the work of emerging and established artists with local, national, and international reputations.